Career of the Week in Public Health: Medical Officer/Drug Evaluation and Safety

Career of the Week in Public Health: Medical Officer/Drug Evaluation and Safety

101 Careers in Public Health 199x300 Career of the Week in Public Health: Medical Officer/Drug Evaluation and SafetyIn this weekly feature, the editors of SpringBoard highlight one career in the health care professions–including a basic description, educational requirements, core competencies/key skills needed, and related web sites and professional organizations where you can find more information!

Job Description

The FDA employs doctors as medical officers to help ensure the safety and effectiveness of prescription and over-the-counter medicines. These physicians interpret research and make important decisions about whether drugs should be approved, how they are manufactured, and what precautions should be in place. Some medical officers are involved in reviewing drug studies. Some make sure that drug labels are accurate. Some inspect manufacturing plants to verify that pills, tablets, and other medicines are being made correctly and are not contaminated. Medical officers also evaluate complaints and reports of side effects from drugs, and they have influence over the creation of new warning labels and even the removal of drugs … Read More

The Paradox of Caring: Nurses’ Mental Health

The Paradox of Caring: Nurses’ Mental Health
Florence Nightingale photo 212x300 The Paradox of Caring: Nurses Mental Health

Florence Nightingale

The essence of nursing remains grounded in the concept of caring, formed on the premise of what Florence Nightingale set out to achieve so many years ago: doing good for others. As centuries have passed, the scope of nursing has evolved and technology and health care have expanded. The heart and soul of nursing have undergone a tumultuous journey.

The role that caring plays in the nursing profession has achieved a certain irony as the health care industry has become more competitive. Professionalism, respect, and teamwork are the foundations of nursing, but they have come under fire as a dog-eat-dog world falls prey to bullying, violence, cronyism, and addictions. Health care organizations plunge forward with their legislative mandates of promoting people’s health and well-being while nurses feel the pinch of no protection, no policies to safeguard them, and no support from senior leaders or executives. This divide can … Read More

Career of the Week in Nursing: Chemotherapy Nurse

Career of the Week in Nursing: Chemotherapy Nurse

201 Careers in Nursing 200x300 Career of the Week in Nursing: Chemotherapy NurseIn this weekly feature, the editors of SpringBoard highlight one career in the health care professions–including a basic description, educational requirements, core competencies/key skills needed, and related web sites and professional organizations where you can find more information!

BASIC DESCRIPTION

Chemotherapy nursing is a specialty within oncology nursing. Chemotherapy nurses administer and monitor the patient receiving chemotherapeutic agents as ordered by physicians. Working closely with oncologists and pharmacists, their job responsibilities could also include obtaining patient histories, collecting specimens, evaluating effectiveness of treatment, and educating patients on treatment and follow-up care.

EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS

A registered nurse license is required, and Bachelor of Science in Nursing is preferred; Basic Life Support certification is required, and Advanced Cardiac Life Support certification is preferred; certification as Oncology Certified Nurse could be obtained by passing a certification examination offered by the Oncology Nursing Society’s Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation. For recertification, 1,000 hours of clinical … Read More

11 Blog Posts on Aging: ‘Borrowed Clothes’

11 Blog Posts on Aging: ‘Borrowed Clothes’

Bea Larsen 11 Blog Posts on Aging: ‘Borrowed Clothes’This is part nine of an 11-part series of blog excerpts written by Bea V. Larsen, JD, Center for Resolution of Disputes. These eleven blogs also appeared in Care Management Journals, Volume 15, Number 1, 2014. Full sample downloads of this journal are available here.

I delight in my Sunday morning ritual. I forego the usual exercise routine and return to bed with coffee and The New York Times. But last week, as I hefted the paper onto my lap, I felt a gentle giving way of the fabric at the elbow of my pajamas. It wasn’t because this iconic newspaper was so weighty but because my sleepwear used to belong to my husband, Len.

I alternate between wearing the light blue and the maroon and have a clear memory of buying them. We were together at a department store. Although still robust in many ways, Len’s legs … Read More

Teens and Mental Health: Nurses and Health Professionals Play an Important Role

Teens and Mental Health: Nurses and Health Professionals Play an Important Role

Mental Health 300x240 Teens and Mental Health: Nurses and Health Professionals Play an Important RoleNew research reveals that 20-50% of today’s teens have mental health issues or illness impacting their daily lives.  Further study notes that of these, 60-90% are not receiving needed treatment!  Unmet mental health needs have been associated with criminality and incarceration, perpetration and victimization of violence and abuse, family discord, poverty, and suicide.  This is especially true during the adolescent years and needs to be addressed immediately.

Recent shootings, suicides, gun violence, and attention on bullying warrants that nurses and other health professionals turn their attention to this important public health issue.  Experts tell us that it is during the childhood and adolescent years that we develop trust, conflict management, and learn to deal with others and stress in our lives.  As noted in Chapter 7 of my book, Fast Facts on Adolescent Health for Nursing and Health Professionals:  A Care Guide in a Nutshell, the teen years are characterized … Read More

Need-to-Know Statistics for All Nurses and Health Professionals

Need-to-Know Statistics for All Nurses and Health Professionals

Need to Know Statistics for All Nurses and Health Professionals 300x179 Need to Know Statistics for All Nurses and Health ProfessionalsFor many years, I have been a faculty member in the College of Nursing at Michigan State University, where I teach, among other courses, research design and statistics in the Master’s programs to prepare nurse practitioners and nurse anesthetists. I also teach a research methods course in our PhD program preparing future nurse researchers and faculty.  Last fall, we started a Doctor of Nursing Practice program, which, while more clinically oriented than the PhD program, will also produce many graduates who will end up teaching in nursing programs.

Given my experience, I am well aware that many students dread quantitative research in general and statistics in particular. At the same time, it is generally accepted in the nursing profession that nursing practice should increasingly be based on empirical evidence. Yet for evidence-based-practice (EBP) to become well established, clinicians, and their teachers, must be able to read the relevant research literature. … Read More

Career of the Week in Healthcare Management: Director of Infection Prevention

Career of the Week in Healthcare Management: Director of Infection Prevention

101 Careers in Healthcare Management1 199x300 Career of the Week in Healthcare Management: Director of Infection PreventionIn this weekly feature, the editors of SpringBoard highlight one career in the health care professions–including a basic description, educational requirements, core competencies/key skills needed, and related web sites and professional organizations where you can find more information!

Job Description

The Director of Infection Prevention serves as the primary resource person for the hospital and the community in the area of infection control. This individual will provide consultation, recommend educational tools, manage staff in areas of surveillance, coordinate projects, reporting, education, regulation, and oversees outbreak investigation.

Education and Experience

Directors of Infection Prevention should have a bachelor of science in nursing and be currently licensed as an RN. A CIC (Certification in Infection Control) is preferred with 3 to 5 years experience in infection control along with management experience.

Core Competencies and Skills

  • Outstanding interpersonal skills including the ability to effectively communicate with persons throughout the organization and in the
Read More

The Book Reviews Are In…

The Book Reviews Are In…

Book Reviews The Book Reviews Are In...In this monthly feature, we collect a few excerpts from reviews of our books.  Here is a sampling of our May and June book reviews:

 Adult CCRN Certification Review: Think in Questions, Learn by Rationale by Kendra Menzies Kent, MS, RN-BC, CCRN, CNRN, SCRN

“[This book] does an excellent job of reviewing the relevant content, with good thought-provoking questions. It is followed by NCLEX style questions and rationales. The book is thorough and current… The book is easy to use and will be an excellent resource for any nurse preparing for the CCRN exam… Score: 100 – 5 Stars! —Doody’s Medical Reviews

Outcome Assessment in Advanced Practice Nursing, 3rd Edition by Ruth M. Kleinpell, PhD, RN-CS, FAAN, FAANP, FCCP

“This is the most up-to-date information available on measuring outcomes for advanced practice nurses… Useful to all APNs, this book would be a valuable part of their professional … Read More

Nurses & Healthcare Professionals Can Make an Impact on Teen Health

Nurses & Healthcare Professionals Can Make an Impact on Teen Health

Nurses Healthcare Professionals Can Make an Impact on Teen Health 300x179 Nurses & Healthcare Professionals Can Make an Impact on Teen HealthWhether we work with teens, encounter teens in our community, or live with teens in our home, we are frequently energized, enthused and challenged by teens and their thoughts and behaviors.  Rather than seeing teens as “another species,” nurses, other health professionals, and anyone interfacing with teens should remember that we were all teens once and that the teens today will be the adults of tomorrow.  As stated by Margaret Mead, “the solution of adult problems tomorrow depends in large measure upon our way our children grow up today.  There is no greater insight into our future than recognizing when we save our children, we save ourselves.” Our role as adults and advocates is to foster teen health, guide teens through their difficult times, and both teach and learn from teens in reciprocal relationships.

An important part of working with teens is to understand how teens grow and develop and … Read More

Nurses and Parkinson’s Disease Part II: Assessing the Costs

Nurses and Parkinson’s Disease Part II: Assessing the Costs

Nurses and Parkinson’s Disease Part II Assessing the Costs 300x179 Nurses and Parkinson’s Disease Part II: Assessing the CostsSusan J. Penner, RN, MN, MPA, DrPH, CNL

Author, Economics and Financial Management for Nurses and Nurse Leaders, Second Edition, 2013.  Dr. Penner is also a PD caregiver.

Many people think that Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is a rare disorder that only causes tremors and slowness.  Part I of this series explains that up to one million Americans may be suffering from PD, and the numbers are likely to grow.  This post assesses the dollar and other costs of PD in the United States. Nurses must understand the full impact of PD to more effectively help address this health concern.

Estimates of the annual costs of PD in America range from $14.4 billion to nearly $25 billion.  These estimates include both medical and non-medical costs.  Medical costs include office visits, hospitalization, medications and surgical implants that help control PD symptoms.  The Parkinson’s Disease Foundation estimates that on average, a … Read More